Slave Clothing of Gor

“The attire of Gorean slave girls is of great importance to their masters. They concern themselves with its tiniest details. The clothing, you see, as well as the girl, belongs to the master; it is natural for him, thus, to take an interest in it; both, in their diverse ways, can be a reflection upon him, his taste, his judgement, his discrimination. What a girl wears, if she is to wear anything, is of great interest to him. After all, she is not a wife; she is much more important; she is a prized possession.” ~Slavegirl Of Gor Pg. 76~

“I suppose it makes sense that they might enjoy putting them on us, like brands and collars. Some men even dress their girls, and, always, the girl’s choices of such things as garb, cosmetics, perfume, jewelry, and such, and, indeed, her entire ensemble, are subject to the master’s approval. Indeed, most often, whether in only a simple tunic, before she hurries forth to a shop, or in luscious slave silk and exciting adornments, before she is to welcome and serve her master’s guests, displaying herself as one of his treasures, she is expected to present herself before him, for his inspection. She is owned.” ~Dancer of Gor Pg. 226~

Binding fiber

stout twine made of strips of leather or of a fiber like hemp; a piece long enough to circle a slavegirl’s waist 2-3 times is often used as a belt for her slave tunic

Camisk

simple, poncho-like slave garment, about 18″ wide: a hole cut in the center for the head, belted at the waist

The camisk is a rectangle of cloth, with a hole cut for the head, rather like a poncho. The edges are commonly folded and stitched to prevent ravelling. The camisk, I am told, normally falls to the knees…The camisk, I am told, was at one time commonly belted with a chain. However, the camisks that I have personally seen, and those we were given, were belted with a long, thin strap of leather binding fiber. This passes once areound the body, and then again, and then is tied, snugly, over the right hip….The belt of binding fiber not only makes it easier to adjust the camisk to a given girl, but of course, the ginding fiber serves to remind her that she is in bondage. In a moment it may be removed, and she may be secured with it, leashed, or bound hand and foot….The camisk, in its way, is an incredibly attractive garment. It displays the girl, but provocatively. Moreover, it proclaims her slave, and begs to be torn away by the hand of the master. Men thrill to see a girl in a camisk. Captive of Gor: Page 64

Camisk, Turian

a style of camisk worn by slaves in the city-state of Turia; cloth shaped like an inverted ‘T’ with a beveled crossbar fastened behind the neck & falls before the wearer’s body; the crossbar then passes between her legs & is then brought forward snugly at the hips ; it is held in place by a single cord that binds it at the back of the neck, behind the back, & in front at the waist; think of a t-shirt, that barely covers the crouch.

“She wore only a single garmet, a long, narrow rectangle of rough, brown material, perhaps eighteen inches in width, drawn over her head like a poncho, falling in front and back a bit above her knees and belted at the waist with a chain.”Outlaw of Gor, page 102

“The Turian camisk, on the other hand, if it were to be laid out on the floor, would appear somewhat like an inverted “T” in which the bar of the “T” would be beveled on each side. It is fastened with a single cord. The cord binds the girl at three points, behind the neck, behind the back, and in front at the waist. The garment itself, as might be supposed, fastens behind the girls neck, passes before her, fastens between her legs, and is then lifted and, folding the two sides of the “T’s” bar about her hips, ties in front. The Turian camisk, unlike the common camisk, will cover the girl’s brand; on the other hand, unlike the common camisk, it leaves the back uncovered and can be tied, and is, snugly, the better to disclose the girl’s beauty.” Nomads of Gor, page 90

Chalwar

baggy pants of diaphanous silk, worn by slavegirls of the Tahari; similar to the harem trousers of Earth Tribesmen of Gor page 105

Chatka

the strip of black leather, some 6 inches by 5 feet long, worn like a breech- clout over the curla by the slavegirls of the Wagon Peoples Nomads of Gor page 30

Clad Kajir

among the Wagon Peoples, this phrase refers to slaves who wear four articles; the curla, chatka, kalmak and koora. Nomads of Gor page 30

Curla

the red waist cord worn slave- girls of the Wagon Peoples; supports the chatka Nomads of Gor page 30

Finger Cymbols

in pairs, made usually of shinny brass…or metal, little round disks, that attach to the forefinger and thumb, that when clashed together in patterns, make a clinging sound

“On the thumb and first finger of both her left and right hand were golden finger cymbals.” Tribesmen of Gor, page 8

“There was a clear note of the finger cymbals, sharp, delicate, bright, and the slave girl danced before us.” Tribesmen of Gor, page 8

Kalmak

vest of black leather worn by the slavegirls of the Wagon Peoples

“Among the Wagon Peoples, to be clad Kajir means, for a girl, to wear four articles, two red two black; a red cord, the Curla, is tied about the waist; the Chatka, or long , narrow strip of black leather, fits over the cord in front, passes under, and then again, from the inside, passes over the cord in back; the chatka is drawn tight; the Kalmak is then donned; it is a short sleeveless vest of black leather; lastly the koora, a strip of red cloth, matching the Curla, is wound about the head, to hold the hair back, for slave women, among the Wagon Peoples, are not permitted to braid, or otherwise dress their hair; it must be, save for the koora, worn loose. For a male slave or Kajirus, of the Wagon Peoples, and there are few, save for the work chains, to be clad Kajir means to wear the Kes, a short, sleeveless work tunic of black leather.” Nomads of Gor, page 30

Kes

short tunic of black leather worn by the male slaves of the Wagon Peoples

“For a male slave, or Kajirus, of the Wagon Peoples, and there are few, save for the work chains, to be clad Kajir means to wear the Kes, a short, sleeveless work tunic of black leather.” Nomads of Gor, page 30

Kirtle

the garb of a slave girl of the Torvald thin white woolen garment ankle-length with a deep plunging neckline.

“I saw four small milk bosk grazing on short grass. In the distance, above the acres, I could see mountains, snowcapped. A flock of verr, herded by a maid with a stick, turned bleating on the sloping hillside. She shaded her eyes. Se was blond; she was barefoot; she wore an ankle-length white kirtle of white wool, sleeveless, split to her belly; about her neck I could see a dark ring.” Marauders of Gor, page 81

“If you are washed and readied” said a young thrall, collared in a kirtle of white wool, “it is permissible to present yourself before the high seat of the house, before my master, Svein Blue Tooth, Jarl of Torvaldsland.” Marauders of Gor, page 194

Koora

strip of red fabric worn as a headband by the slavegirls of the Wagon Peoples

“Among the Wagon Peoples, to be clad Kajir means, for a girl, to wear four articles, two red two black; a red cord, the Curla, is tied about the waist; the Chatka, or long , narrow strip of black leather, fits over the cord in front, passes under, and then again, from the inside, passes over the cord in back; the chatka is drawn tight; the Kalmak is then donned; it is a short sleeveless vest of black leather; lastly the koora, a strip of red cloth, matching the Curla, is wound about the head, to hold the hair back, for slave women, among the Wagon Peoples, are not permitted to braid, or otherwise dress their hair; it must be, save for the koora, worn loose. For a male slave or Kajirus, of the Wagon Peoples, and there are few, save for the work chains, to be clad Kajir means to wear the Kes, a short, sleeveless work tunic of black leather.” Nomads of Gor, page 30

Pleasure Silks

Diaphonous silks of varied colors which are used to entice men by their brevity. They do not conceal but enhance the slave’s body and are most often worn by Tavern slaves.

I slipped on the bit of silk. I looked in the mirror and shuddered. I had been naked before men, many times, but it did not seem to me that I had been so naked as this. It was Gorean pleasure silk. Not naked, I seemed more than naked. Captive of Gor, page 322

Slave Livery

The most common of slave outfits, it is basically a very short dress, split down the middle, held together with a cord. It rides high upon the thighs and comes in a variety of patterns and materials.

She wore the briefly skirted, sleeveless slave livery common in the northern cities of Gor; the livery was yellow and split to the cord that served as her belt; about her throat she wore a matching collar, yellow enameled over steel. Assassins of Gor, page 7

Slave Rag

Another name for Ta-Teera. A scandalously short garment of brown cloth, normally torn or ripped, held together by two small hooks which pull the garment tight about the body, accentuating every curve of the slave.

Joyfully I drew on the garment, slipping it over my head and fastened it, more tightly about me, by the two tiny hooks on the left. The slit made the garment, a rather snug one, easier to slip into; the two hooks, when fastened, naturally increased the snugness of the garment, drawing it quite close about the breasts and hips; deliciously then, from the point of view of a man, the girl’s figure is betrayed and accentuated; also, the two hooks do not close the slit on the left completely, but permit men to gaze upon the sweet slave flesh held pent, held captive, within Slave Girl of Gor, page 76

Ta-Teera

The Gorean Slave Rag, it is scandalously short and of brown cloth, fastened tightly about the body to accentuate every curve of the slave which wears it. It is an utterly sensual garment. See Slave Rag for more info.

Eta pulled at the bit of rag she wore. “Ta-Teera,” she said. I looked down at the scrap of rag, outrageously brief, so scandalous, so shameful, fit only for a slave girl, which I wore. I smiled. I had been placed in a Ta-Teera. Slave Girl of Gor, page 81

Thrall Tunic

A short work tunic of white wool that male slaves of Torvaldsland, called thralls, are dressed in.

Men in the fields wore short tunics of white wool; some carried hoes; their hair was close cropped; about their throats had been hammered bands of black iron, with a welded ring attached. Marauders of Gor, page 82